Built-in Cabinetry and Shelves

Cabinets are an integral part of organizing your home and making the most of the space you have.

It’s important to understand what what your options are: floor cabinets, wall cabinets, framed cabinets and frameless cabinets. The variety of cabinets may seem overwhelming at first.

In terms of kitchen cabinets, we have some choices between base cabinets versus wall cabinets.

Base cabinets are also known as floor cabinets, and are meant to be installed on the floor. Wall cabinets are, by definition, affixed to the wall. Typically, base cabinets include a countertop. This countertop can often act as the focal point of the kitchen and can be made from various materials, and everything from a solid wood chopping block to marble. Often, base cabinets are built around the existing plumbing in your kitchen.

Wall cabinets, are available in a multitude of sizes and shapes, and come in variations of everything from those with doors (glass, or classic wood) or open cabinets for easy reach. Most wall cabinets come built with adjustable shelving that are lined with peg holes on both sides of the cabinet walls. This option is functional and adjustable, but also not as stable as the custom built varieties Eclectic Builders excels in.

If you have unusual dimensions in your kitchen, however, or want to make the most of your space, consider talking to the master designers at Eclectic Builders in Manhattan for your custom kitchen cabinets. They’ll let you in on every part of the process on everything from the material used to the final positioning.

Balusters, Balustrades and Banisters

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What are they and what are the different types of Balusters, Balustrades and Banisters

oak baluster

burnished oak baluster

They’re not all synonyms. So, what’s the difference?

A “baluster” is a molded shaft that most often supports the handrail of a staircase, but also can be used to support a parapet, which is a wall-like barrier often at the edge of a roof.

Balusters often are made of stone or wood, and sometimes made of metal.

A “balustrade” is a sequence of balusters that support a handrail.

A “banister” — also spelled with two “n”s — is another name for a staircase baluster, but many architects and interior designers prefer to reserve the word “banister” for a narrower, more-modern support.

Here in the United States, we also tend to use the word “banister” to refer to the handrail of a staircase.

So, in general:

– “baluster” refers to the support of a staircase handrail.
– “balustrade” refers to a series of balusters.
– “banister” refers to the support of the handrail.

And still know, some will use “banister” to refer to the staircase handrail!

Innovative Woodwork

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Taking wood to the next level


Eclectic Builders in Manhattan works with specialists and their fine eye for detail, quality and workmanship. Whether your project is for a custom-built bamboo home office, a full-scale re-molding project, or an upbeat and contemporary finished roof deck, Eclectic Builders has you covered. They have worked with mahogany, white oak, teak, cypress and pine. Indoor wood floors have ranged from the classic to the modern from traditional planking to intricate inlaid designs.

All woods have been treated and tempered not only to create the correct finish to fit your home, but to last not just for your years – but for generations!

Wooden tiles, stains and specialized fittings are all part of the Eclectic Builders aesthetic, bringing your home to life.

Art Nouveau Molded White Oak Staircase

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The Art Nouveau period comes to life again

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Refinished white oak staircase

Incredible molded detail on this white oak staircase and paneled wall detail. Art Nouveau wooden panels painstakingly remodeled and refinished for exquisite effect for the interior of this late 19th century New York City home.

Notice in particular, the hand-crafted heating grate, cut to mimic the design details in the staircase in general. A stunning example of how creative minds and traditional style can go hand in hand.

Part of a full restoration project that included all floors, banisters, and other decorative features. Four main carpenters were used on this wood working project, as well as specialists who worked to restore specialized features.